Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 

Forum for discussion on chlorination, slow sand filtration, micro filtration, nano filtration, UV irradiation, desalination, reverse osmosis, roughing filtration, charcoal filtration, sedimentation, coagulation and flocculation, solar distillation, compact water treatment unit performance, etc.

Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby SumKot » 10 Jun 2009 09:06

We chlorinate water in refugee camp in Thailand using Calcium Hypochlorite HTH 70%. We have small chlorine free residual but water taste bad - very chlorine taste and smell. Ideas you have any good ones?

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
10 Jun 2009 09:06

User avatar
SumKot
 
Posts: 2
Reputation:

Joined: June 2009

Re: Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby T.Prior » 20 Jul 2009 16:05

Two methods:

Pour water into a large container and agitate to cause aeration. This will help to get some or most of the chlorine gas out. Also, heating the water in an open pot will help vent the chlorine. "allow water to cool for drinking purposes, but do not allow to sit too long as bacteria may form once again.

Granular activated carbon filtration can be used. If this is not available locally or too expensive, make your own! Typically, coconut shells are used to make the activated carbon. In any case, the carbon with need to be replaced at regular intervals depending on size and use. Keep carbon filters sealed, in a cool location and out of direct sunlight!

Good luck.

t.prior2007@hotmail.com

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
User avatar
T.Prior
 
Posts: 13
Reputation:

National Flag: Canada
Joined: July 2009

Re: Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby HappyPlumber » 20 Jul 2009 22:35

T.Prior has the right idea - a little aeration to let any dissolved gases escape and activated carbon is good for any water supply system (especially ground water). There are a number of systems you can use for aeration - but I would suggest some form of simple multiple tray type. You may also want to get someone to take a closer look at your chlorine chemistry - especially your chloramine production which can often give unpleasant tastes and smells. It may even be worth looking at your chlorine dose to try to acheive breakpoint chlorination (especially if your distribution network is short).

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
Attachments
Multiple Tray Aerator.jpg
User avatar
HappyPlumber
 
Posts: 82
Reputation:

National Flag: Great Britain
Joined: July 2009
Years of WASH Experience: 10
WASH Country Experience: Albania, Afghanistan, Burundi, Chad, DRC, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guatemala, Haiti, Indonesia, Myanmar, N. Caucasus, Pakistan, Sudan, Thailand, Tibet
WASH Work Experience: Water for People, MSF-B, IRC, UNICEF, MDM, ACF.

Re: Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby FairWater » 20 Jul 2009 23:06

We recently advised IDP camps (internal Displaced People) in Ethiopia, similar conditions. Chlorination is not so much the best answer (only adviced in times of heavy cholera) and simple filtration works fine and can provides safe starage as well. I attach some examples. The larger Unit (whit 500 liter tank) is an interesting option for camps and provides up to 50 people daily. They had only dirty surface water available, so with the use of this double unit (see drawing, inside filter bucket with biosand, note the safe storage inside the upside down PVC bucket) it provides storage and filtering (=FairWater's eco-sand filter system, or improved Bio sand filter system).

All filters are easily made from local avilable PBV buckets and tanks. Besides it works in the camp, it also gives the people the idea to continue this later.

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
Attachments
DSC04117.JPG
DSC04208.JPG
FairWater Filter and storage Unit-01.pdf
(205.34 KiB) Downloaded 324 times
FairWater Foundation promotes BlueZones with the durable BluePump

www.fairwater.org
User avatar
FairWater
 
Posts: 26
Reputation:

National Flag: Netherlands
Joined: June 2009
Location: Amsterdam
Years of WASH Experience: 25
WASH Country Experience: All over Africa
WASH Work Experience: See www.fairwater.org

Re: Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby SumKot » 24 Jul 2009 17:14

nice photo maybe make will for house. Boss say we must chlorinate becasue SPHERE guide say all piping system not just in choloera time must chlorinate. Thank you sir. Will try aeration.

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
User avatar
SumKot
 
Posts: 2
Reputation:

Joined: June 2009

Re: Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby cdawggy » 30 Nov 2009 08:11

what sort of free residuals are left in the water and at what level are locals complaining?
just remember to check your chlorine residual after boiling or aeration... you may get rid of the taste and in the process get rid of your free chlorine residual, which i suppose defeats the whole exercise. let us know how you get along, as i am curious to know if the aeration works...
activated carbon will also get rid of the taste and the free residual. one precaution is with the safe storage of the carbon itself. if for example it gets dirty, your activated carbon could act as a source of contamination.
not sure breakpoint chlorination is a feasible alternative. has anyone actually managed to achieve breakpoint chlorination using the chlorine pooltesters color comparators?

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
User avatar
cdawggy
 
Posts: 37
Reputation:

Joined: November 2009

Re: Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby Constantine » 07 Dec 2010 02:32

Chlorine and its taste will dissipate after two days. Generally, in POU try to disinfect
with chlorine (when possible), store the treated water, wait two days and consume
(without bad taste).

Most fecal bacteria and virus will die within one hour with proper chlorine treatment.
However, microbial cysts like cryptosporidium are highly resistant to chlorine and can take
up to a week to die.

The only certain way (I know) to kill all pathogens is pasteurization - heating to 160° F
(71° C) for at least 15 seconds. This can be accomplished using thermal energy from sunlight
or heating with fuel. One my website I show some affordable and novel ways to pasteurize
water using sunlight (http://www.h2ohow.com).


Peace,
Constantine
H2oHow.com

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
User avatar
Constantine
 
Posts: 11
Reputation:

National Flag: United States of America
Joined: December 2010
Location: Louisiana, USA
Years of WASH Experience: 2
WASH Country Experience: USA
WASH Work Experience: Amateur scientist and inventor.

Re: Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby nem.isis » 07 Dec 2010 07:59

I wouldn't necessarily follow Constantine's advice. Indeed, chlorine and its taste dissipate after two days and so will the protection it offers. So, if you wait two days and your chlorine (residual) is gone, then you no longer have any assurance that the water is safe.
BTW 1, SODIS and (solar thermal) pasteurisation, will also suffer from the same limitation... the lack of a residual protection and are hence prone to recontamination.
BTW 2,Pasteurisation is not the only way to inactivate pathogens. You could also boil the water or even autoclave it at (121 C); although this latter option is of very little practical significance with regards to drinking water treatment.
Isis

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
User avatar
nem.isis
 
Posts: 35
Reputation:

Joined: October 2010
Years of WASH Experience: 0
WASH Country Experience: Several
WASH Work Experience: Several

Re: Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby JKMakowka » 08 Dec 2010 11:32

As mentioned before it is most likely not the chlorine itself that is causing the bad taste and smell, but rather the chloramine (NH2Cl) reaction-by-products. If you have the testing equipment I would test for ammonia (NH3) in the water, as that is the most likely reactant of the chlorine.
Ammonia is usually found in water sources with little oxygen content (well water etc) as otherwise it is nitrified (NH3->NO2->NO3) to the less problematic nitrate (NO3). However some modern fertilizers also introduce ammonia into the water, and it is also found in fresh animal manure.

It is not that easy to remove the ammonia however. You can try raw water aeration, flocculation or active carbon filtration. But a slow/bio sand filter will get rid of it in it's schmutzdecke quite easily.

Alternatively you can also use Chlorine-dioxide (ClO2) (or Ozone) as the disinfectant, as it does not form many smelling by-products. But I guess that will be hard to get in Thailand.

Not sure if it is such a good idea to aerate the treated water, as you will basically remove the chlorine to a large extend by it, and thus loose the storage disinfection (residual) effect.

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
User avatar
JKMakowka
 
Posts: 95
Reputation:

National Flag: Germany
Joined: June 2010
Location: Germany
Years of WASH Experience: 5
WASH Country Experience: Nepal, Pakistan, Vietnam, Bénin
WASH Work Experience: Various

Re: Waste Taste Bad - Very Chlorine

Postby Constantine » 11 Dec 2010 16:29

First, the easiest solution is to see if the level of chlorine can be
safely reduced at the source. There may well be a very good
reason the level is so high or it's a product of human error.
It never hurts to double check.

Now, before I get too far ahead, let me state that chlorination is the
best proven method to disinfect lots of hazardous water in an emergency.
However, too much chlorine, over time, can contribute to a number
of new health concerns. Brother, I got to believe the chemical taste
and smell is awful bad, else you would not of asked for help.

Also, I like T.Prior's ideas to agitate and aerate the water or heat it.
This is a good starting point. If these methods work, you're home.
However, if these methods aren't enough, here's my additional
suggestion, below.

Assuming the level is high for a good reason, you can safely
replace chlorine with solar disinfection (SODIS). I think SODIS is
the most affordable alternative to chlorine given your situation
(refugee camp). The suns ultraviolet rays kill germs without any
smell or aftertaste. So long as your water is clear - free of
sediments and debris - you can use SODIS.

To learn more about SODIS see - http://www.sodis.ch

If you place the water in storage with loose fitting lids and covers,
most of the chlorine will dissipate in 2-3 days. That is, cover the
storage vessels enough so that nothing gets in, but chlorine gas
(and volatile byproducts) can escape. Smell and taste samples of
the water after two days to see if more time is needed. However,
after a few days you will have the worse problem of new pathogen
growth - isolate the water so no one drinks it until it's disinfected.
When the water is ready, use SODIS to make it safe again. Basically,
for SODIS water treatment you fill clear plastic PET bottles with hazardous
water, expose the water bottles to direct sunlight for at least 6 hours
(better all day) on sunny days and for two consecutive days if the weather
is mostly cloudy.

SODIS bottles may include any clear plastic (number 1) PET soda or water
bottle (up to 3-liters) that you can recycle. If bottles are not available,
on my website I show how to make your own affordable SODIS bags.

Because you live in Thailand you are well within the +/-35 degrees of
latitude from the equator to use SODIS.

Combining SODIS with chlorination has an advantage over chlorine, alone.
The ultraviolet rays (and heat) of the sun kill any pathogens including microbial
cysts that chlorine has not yet killed or deactivated. There still may be some
residual chlorine, but you will have a fresher tasting drink - that's pathogen free.
Some residual chlorine is desired, especially if you store the water for long.

If SODIS water bottles are kept unopened after treatment and placed in a cool,
dark place, they can be stored indefinitely. Dead pathogens cannot reproduce.
The only things that may grow are algae. However, these are not a threat.

I hope this helps.


Peace,
Constantine
H2oHow.com

1 Ratings (3.0 Stars out of 6.0) 1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars).1 Ratings (3.0 Stars). 
User avatar
Constantine
 
Posts: 11
Reputation:

National Flag: United States of America
Joined: December 2010
Location: Louisiana, USA
Years of WASH Experience: 2
WASH Country Experience: USA
WASH Work Experience: Amateur scientist and inventor.


Return to 1.13 Water Treatment



 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron