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Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby Bubbles » 28 Nov 2009 18:57

I recently visited some friends in Southern Spain and stopped off in a restaurant where I was impressed by the toilet facilities. I regret not taking a photo at the time and have struggled to find anything similar on the internet. The toilet basically consisted of a normal porcelain flush toilet with cistern however directly above the cistern (the cistern lid in fact) was a normal porcelain washing basin with taps. Basically when you use the toilet you wash your hands with soap in the sink which directly fills the cistern. When you’ve finished washing your hands you pull a nylon cord which comes up through the plughole which releases the grey water to flush the toilet. It was clear that the basin and toilet flushing system had been designed as a unit and was manufactured beautifully in porcelain in a design. I just wanted to share my experience as I think it is a novel solution for both developed and developing countries where there are water shortages. The only similar photo I could find on the internet is a design by the Spanish sanitary company Roca.

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28 Nov 2009 18:57

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Re: Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby CompostToiletsRock » 01 Dec 2009 11:50

That's one sweet lookin' dunny. Although, how about this? Much simpler! ;)

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Re: Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby F_Malcovich » 18 Sep 2010 22:20

Here's a variation on a theme, the eco urinal and sink combo.

eco-urinal-1_mtTyT_24429.jpg
eco-urinal-2_EQUxm_24429.jpg
king-of-urinal_01_gYt87_17621.jpg


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Re: Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby bergbrains » 07 Oct 2010 17:31

In Japan we had a similar toilet in our apartment. There was a regular sink, and then a separate toilet room. A second sink was above the water tank. The water would run when you flushed the toilet. The soapy water would be in the tank for the next flush. I found a few examples online.

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The Japanese "otearai" may have a sink above the water tank.
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Re: Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby HealtheWorld » 08 Oct 2010 14:46

I've never actually seen a toilet quite like this. It's really quite interesting! Do you suppose that this type of toilet/sink contraption would be useful in countries where the water supply is limited? Many people waste a tremendous amount of water flushing their toilets and I'm sure that this would alleviate many of their water issues. It may not alleviate all of them as new and clean water is a necessity, but it would still help, no?

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Why do we let the poor get poorer and let the rich get richer? :(
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Re: Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby Juno » 22 Jan 2011 09:34

The problem is that the cost of water in the west is still too cheap to encourage water economization and reuse. If water started to become expensive everyone would start switching to low water flush and reuse technology pretty quickly. At the moment these devices are limited to those trying to make a token effort to reduce their environmental footprint.

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Re: Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby Juno » 29 May 2011 09:58

We need to start doing all we can conserve water and I love this gretwater reuse flush toilet. I found this graphic this morning and thought I would post it here. I can't belief it takes 10 liters of water to make one sheet of paper, that's the last time I print anything!

Water Use.gif


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Re: Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby JKMakowka » 30 May 2011 04:18

Even though I understand the purpose of these "virtual water" comparisons... the problem is that the water is not really "used" and a lot of it is reused over and over again in the same processes or others (and I am not taking about the general global water cycle). Thus ultimately "virtual water" is a flawed analogy.

Concerning water use in general... well the problem is rather a problem of unequal distribution, there are plenty of countries that really don't need to save water by means of grey-water reuse and such.

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Re: Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby Zimba » 17 Jun 2011 08:23

JK, I agree that the problem is unequal distribution of water and some countries don't really need to save water. However considering global trends of urbanization, population growth and water stress in certain regions, I think it's generally recognized that water conservation is a good strategy in any context. Even in countries that don't really need to conserve water, it's a question of conserving energy (extraction, processing, storage, and distribution of water all requires energy and resources) as well as being responsible with earth's resources. Juno, here's another great promotional image on home water use and conservation.

HomeWaterConservation550.jpg


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Re: Greywater Reuse Flush Toilet

Postby Bubbles » 17 Jun 2011 16:01

If you really want to calculate how much water you use (your personal water footprint) there is an interesting water footprint calculator here http://www.waterfootprint.org/index.php ... Calculator which basically asks you questions on the types of food you eat, your domestic water usage (do you take showers or baths etc), how often you wash your car, how often you water the garden etc. There's also a pretty complex water footprint assessment manual.

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